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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 25 апр 2018, 00:00

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1. Sneak Peek at June's Artwork - 2018-04-24 11:35:00
Who’s ready to take a sneak peek at some of the exciting new artwork featured in our upcoming books? Today we'll be looking ahead into June 2018 and at three of our series books, which are now available to pre-order.
Latin American Wars 1900–1941 by Philip Jowett
Illustrated by Stephen Walsh

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This first plate from Men-at-Arms 519: Latin American Wars 1900–1941 depicts 3 figures during the Central American Wars (1900-1911). On the left is a Private of the Honduran Army, Namasique 1907. He resembles in most respects his counterparts in the Nicaraguan, Guatemalan, and El Salvadorian armies, though he does wear a simple kepi-style cap with a ribbon bow in the colors of Honduras sewn on the front. Equipment is rudimentary, with a simple canvas haversack to carry his kit and a few spare cartridges; he is fortunate to have been issued with a Winchester M1895 rifle. The next figure kneeling in the middle is Tracy Richardson of the Nicaraguan Army in 1909. Employed for his expertise in firing and maintencance of machine guns, he is seen here with a Colt-Browning M1895 'potato digger'. The final figure is a Private of the El Salvadorian Army, 1906. This standard-bearer seen during the short war with Guatemala in 1906 carries a flag of the design used from the 1870s until 1912, when El Salvador introduced the present-day flag. He is wearing typical improvised Central American uniform of the period.
US Airborne Soldier vs German Soldier by David Campbell
Illustrated by Steve Noon

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This second plate from Combat 33: US Airborne Soldier vs German Soldier depicts two companies of 3/504th storming the Hof van Holland. After scrambling ashore, 12 men work their way around to the fort’s southern flank where a causeway leads into the heart of the position.Two men attempt to cross the causeway to the fort’s entrance where a firefight and an exchange of stick grenades and No. 82 “Gammon” bombs (a type of grenade made from an explosive-filled stockinette bag that detonated on sharp contact) breaks out with the defenders in the inner courtyard, prompting the remaining men to charge across the causeway and scale the Hof van Holland’s walls in an attempt to gain the parapet and destroy the gun emplacements for good.
US Flush-Deck Destroyers 1916–45 by Mark Lardas
Illustrated by Johnny Shumate

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This final plate from US-Flush Deck Destroyers 1916-45 depics the battle of Balikpapan, where flush-deck destroyers served as torpedo platforms. Here, the Japanese were silhoutted against the glow of burning refineries to the north, whilst the US were invisible in the dark. Manoeuvring through the Japanese, the destroyers fired torpedoes at the Japanese ships that passed, resulting in a confusing melee with the Japanese not realising they were being attacked until their ships began exploding. Only five ships out of 17, all anchored, were hit by the 48 torpedoes fired.
We hope you enjoyed taking a sneak peek at these new exciting pieces. Let us know your favourite in the comments below!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 26 апр 2018, 00:00

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1. Anzac Day 2018 - 2018-04-25 16:07:00
Today, 25 April, marks the 102nd anniversary since the first Anzac Day. Originally created to honour the members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Anzac Cove as part of the Gallipoli Camapign during World War I, it is now observed each year to honour Australian and New Zealand troops who have served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.
Today we look back at the events of 1915, which inspired Anzac Day the following year. Below is an extract from Warrior 155: Anzac Infantryman 1914-15 by Ian Sumner, which looks at the Anzacs landing.
'As they drew closer to the enemy shore early in the morning of 25 April, some of the men in the boats were struck by the stillness of the scene. Lieutenant Ivor Margetts, a Tasmanian serving with 12th Battalion, recalled: ‘I am quite sure few of us realized that at last we were actually bound for our baptism of fire for it seemed as though we were just out on one of our night manoeuvres in Mudros harbour, but very soon we realized it was neither a surprise party nor a moonlight picnic.’ For others the predominant memory of the 40-minute trip from the transports to the landing beach was how long it seemed: ‘like days’ for Sergeant Henry Cheney (10th Battalion) and ‘to go on for ever’ for Lieutenant Aubrey Darnell (11th Battalion).
However tough their training regime, it had done nothing to prepare the Anzacs for the shock of landing under fire that morning. The leading boats were within 20m of the shore when the Turks opened fire. Reginald Nicholas, a Perth man serving with the Hospital Transport Corps, described the scene: ‘Our boys had to jump over the side of boats into the water, in some places up to the armpits … men [were] killed in the boats and in the water … looking down at the bottom of the sea, you could see a carpet of dead men… shot getting out of the boats.’

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Reinforcements arrive at Anzac Cove (Illustrated by Graham Turner)
Another Western Australian shared similar memories. Private (later CSM) George Feist of 12th Battalion recalled:
I was in the second tow, and we got it, shrapnel and rifle fire bad. We lost three on the destroyer and four in the boat getting to land. The Turks were close on the beach when we got there. We had to fix bayonets and charge. We jumped into the water up to our waists and some … their armpits … we had to trust to the penknife at the end of our rifles. When I got there it was not too long, but … I tell you you do not forget these things … all we thought of was to get at them. One would hear someone say ‘They’ve got me’ and register another notch when you get to them, that’s all.
The Anzacs landed in 12 ‘tows’. Consisting of a picket boat, a steam launch or pinnace, a cutter and a lifeboat, each tow was capable of carrying 120–60 men. The steam launch brought them as close as possible to the shore, and then cutters rowed them to the beach. Hamilton had requested more boats, but in vain. He could land only two divisions at a time, the boats then returning to the transports to collect the follow-up waves. The brigades and battalions of the assault force had rehearsed the landing on the nearby Aegean island of Lemnos from 15 to 18 April. There they were told: ‘no rifle fire is to be employed until broad daylight. The bayonet only is to be used. No bugle calls are to be sounded after leaving Lemnos. No bugle calls are to be sounded during the charge.’ But, under the circumstances, this was a counsel of perfection. Of all the battalions in the assault force, the men of 11th Battalion appear to have met the heaviest fire as they approached the beach, and they were ‘shouting and hurraying and calling the Turks all the rude names they could think of’.
‘Straight up that rugged, rocky precipice we went,’ recalled Henry Cheney. And this despite the burden they were carrying: a full pack, three sandbags, three days’ worth of tinned rations and up to 200 rounds of ammunition – for most men somewhere around 75lb (34kg) in weight. Tom Usher, a Queenslander, served with 9th Battalion:
You’re up to your neck in water – and a lot of them got drowned, too, with the weight of their packs and that – then scramble ashore and take shelter as quick as you could. You’re only looking after yourself, you couldn’t worry about the other bloke, you had to get ashore as quick as you could – just keep your rifle above your head, keep it dry… I could see these cliffs, and I ran for it. You didn’t care who you were with as long as you got away from the fire.'

We'd like to wish all our customers from Australia and New Zealand commemorating Anzac Day, a reflective and peaceful day.


2. Sneak Peek - Frostgrave: The Maze of Malcor - 2018-04-25 08:12:58
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This article was first posted on Joseph A. McCullough's blog on Tuesday, 24th April. Be sure to follow it to hear more about Frostgrave, Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago and some of the other projects he is working on! It is hard to believe, but it is almost a year since the last Frostgrave supplement set in the Frozen City (Ulterior Motives) was released. Well, that is about to change! In June the game returns to the Frozen City in a big way with the release of The Maze of Malcor. Why is the Maze so big? Well, first off, it truly is bigger. I wrote 50% more words for this supplement than any of the previous supplements and this gave me a lot of room to play! The heart of the book is the 12 scenario campaign, all set in the recently uncovered, and partially ruined, ‘Collegium of Artistry’. The first 6 scenarios follow most of the conventions set out in previous supplements. However, after that point, the Wraith of Malcor, the last headmaster of the Collegium, becomes aware of the intruders, and starts sending his servants, the Wizard Shades, after them. The Wizard Shades can either be run as uncontrolled creatures or played by an additional player. Each of the Wizard Shades is a unique character that represents one of the five lost schools of magic from ‘The Pentangle’ and wields spells that have rarely, if ever, been seen in the last thousand years… At the end of the campaign, the players get to face Malcor himself. I have, on occasion, been accused of making the final scenario in Thaw of the Lich Lord too easy. Well, hopefully I have made up for it here…
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So, what else is in the book? Well, 30 spells from the Pentangle. These can be found on scrolls during the scenarios and thus used by wizards. These spells aren’t designed to be learned by wizards, but then, when did Frostgrave players ever let such things stand in their way… Also, for the first time since Frostgrave was released nearly three years ago, I have included a section of ‘rules updates’. These are my suggested changes to the basic rules of the game. They are optional (as is everything), but I think players who try them will agree they improve the game in a variety of ways. Included in this section is a new Experience Point table. Finally, there is a double-sized treasure table, and, of course, a bunch of new monsters to fight. Oh, and sky gondolas, did I mention that? Actually, June is going to be a big month for Frostgrave. Releasing at the same time as The Maze of Malcor is The Grimoire – a set of spell cards which includes all of the spells from the basic book and all of the supplements, including the Pentangle spells in Malcor. Also coming in June is Matthew Ward’s second (and somewhat darker) Frostgrave novel, Oathgold – no spoilers, but 'rangifer'.
And will their be new minis? Of course there will! If that’s not enough for you, well, check back in a day or two for another small Frostgrave-related announcement.
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Frostgrave: The Maze of Malcor, Frostgrave: The Grimoire, and Frostgrave: Oathgold are all publishing in June 2018. Preorder them on the store today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 28 апр 2018, 00:00

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1. Osprey Games Weekend Sale! - 2018-04-27 13:49:57
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On Saturday it's International Tabletop Day, and we thought we'd celebrate with a weekend sale, offering 20% off selected titles. A few exclusions apply - none of our April releases are discounted, nor are our preorders - but other than that everything is fair game!
Below are some of the highlights of the sale: Sakura

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Reiner Knizia
Players: 2-6
Sakura is a light tactical game of pushing your luck, and pushing your friends. Each player will simultaneously decide how far to move both their character and the Emperor. The player closest to the Emperor when the cherry blossoms are reached will gain a huge amount of prestige, but if you push too far you risk bumping into the Emperor and walking away in disgrace.


Order your copy here.






'Nam: The Vietnam War Miniatures Game

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Battlefront
‘Nam gives you have everything* you need to take command of one of these forces. Building on the success of Battlefront's Team Yankee, these rules and forces are easy to learn and use. Within these pages you can find all of the scenarios, missions, and notes on terrain to fully brief you before you step onto your Huey to lead your troops to the landing zone!
*Well, almost everything. A groovy playlist of 1960s tunes is compulsory for maximum playability.


Order your copy here.


Gaslands

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Mike Hutchinson
Shoot, ram, skid and loot your way through the ruins of civilisation with Gaslands, a tabletop wargame of car-on-car destruction in a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Players control small fleets of armed vehicles in battles for resources, dominance and survival. With rules for multiple vehicle types (from motorbikes to big rigs), varied special weapons and accessories (including oil slicks, caltrops and nitro boosters), and a host of options for scenarios, environmental conditions, crew and campaigns, players can tailor games to match their own visions for an anarchic future.




Order your copy here.



London: Second Edition

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Martin Wallace
Players: 2-4
Martin Wallace's classic tableau-builder has been entirely updated for this edition, with revised rules and new artwork. Oversized borough cards showcase famous locations, while the city cards follow the development of London right up to the twentieth century. Grow your city through the years, as you vie to become an icon of London.


Order your copy here.


Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago

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Joseph A. McCullough
In this wargame, set in the world of Frostgrave, players take on the role of Heritors, mighty warriors whose ancestors drank from the Crystal Pool. These Heritors lead their small, handpicked teams of spellcasters, rogues, and treasure hunters into the ever-shifting labyrinth of the Ghost Archipelago. Using the same rules system as Frostgrave, this standalone wargame focuses on heroes who draw on the power in their blood to perform nigh-impossible feats of strength and agility. This game also includes 30 spells drawn from five schools of magic, a host of soldier types, challenging scenarios, treasure tables, and a full bestiary of the most common creatures that inhabit the Lost Isles.


Order your copy here.


The sale ends on Monday 30th of April, so grab some great deals while you can!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 02 май 2018, 00:00

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1. May's Book Vote and April's Results - 2018-05-01 09:05:51
New Vanguard is the featured series of May's Book Vote, and as always we're showcasing five fascinating book ideas for you to choose from. Please take a read of the descriptions below, decide on which you'd like to see published, and make your vote by clicking the link below! Don't forget to discuss this month's options in the comments below.
NVG: Strategic SAMs of the USSR and Russia
NVG: French Main Battle Tanks 1945-present: ARL 44, AMX-30 and Leclerc
NVG: M4 Sherman in British Service
NVG: Pink Panthers: Land Rovers of the SAS 1950s-2014 NVG: Robot Tanks of World War II

Strategic SAMs of the USSR and Russia
Following the success of the high-altitude SA-2 system, the Soviet Union poured effort into developing longer-ranged and much more comprehensive systems. The S-200 of the 1960s could shoot down bombers at a range approaching 200 miles, and the famous S-300 family that followed in the late 1970s was – and remains – among the most capable air defence systems in the world. Variants have added capabilities against ballistic missiles, countermeasures, and low-level targets, and the S-300s have now been joined by the even more fearsome S-400. These systems have been important features of the modern wars in Libya and Syria, with both Soviet-era export systems and modern Russian-operated systems in action against Western air forces and missiles.
French Main Battle Tanks 1945-present: ARL 44, AMX-30 and Leclerc
France consistently developed and fielded its own tanks throughout the Cold War and afterwards. Learning much from captured Panther and Tiger tanks, it built a handful of ARL-44 tanks in the 1950s, followed by the successful AMX-30 – which brought the distinctive French philosophy of limiting weight in favour of better mobility. Its modern replacement, the Leclerc, refined this with a focus on active rather than passive protection, and both were exported, particularly to Middle Eastern states. This book would look at these significant Cold War MBTs, as well as the other French tank projects that failed to make it to production.
M4 Sherman in British Service
British troops were initially suspicious of their new American-built Lend-Lease tanks in the early part of the war. But by D-Day the Sherman equipped more armoured regiments than any other, and British tankers had almost come to think of them as British tanks. This book would focus on the ordinary gun tank versions of the Sherman, examining Britain’s preferred versions and adaptations, and how they were used in British Army service across Europe.
Pink Panthers: Land Rovers of the SAS 1950s-2014
For more than half a century the Special Air Service’s unique Land Rovers helped make the unit’s reputation. They were stripped down to the essentials, painted pink (surprisingly, the ideal colour for desert camouflage), extensively customised to operate alone in the most inhospitable environments, and heavily armed. From the first Series I conversion to be used in Oman through to the fleets of 110 DPVs that fought the Gulf War, his book uncovers the Land Rovers’ roles, their many versions, variants, and possible configurations, and what it was like to operate and fight them, deep inside hostile deserts.
Robot Tanks of World War II
Germany built the most famous remote-controlled demolition vehicles of World War II – the tiny Goliath, the medium-sized Springer, and the large Borgward IV. The Goliath and Springer were tracked, remote-controlled mines – built to survive only long enough to be blown up in the right place. The Borgward was heavier, and designed to emplace its charge and then withdraw relatively unscathed. But it was not alone. The USSR built and operated a series of ‘Teletanks’ for particularly dangerous operations, and Britain designed an unsuccessful Mobile Land Mine along the lines of the German Goliath.
Make your vote by clicking here!
It was the turn of our longest-running series, Men-at-Arms, to take the focus of the book vote last month. With an incredible selection to choose from, it was finally the Yugoslav Armies 1941–45 option that ended the month on top with 26.47%. See below the full results of last month's vote: MAA: Women at War 1914–18 17.95% MAA: Iberian Warriors 500–50 BC 23.82% MAA: Yugoslav Armies 1941–45 26.47% MAA: Spanish Troops in South America 1809–1826 16.78% MAA: French Naval & Colonial Troops 1816-1870 14.98%


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 05 май 2018, 00:00

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1. The Ship That Would Not Die - 2018-05-04 16:07:00
Today's guest blog post is from Thomas McKelvey Cleaver, author of Tidal Wave: From Leyte Gulf to Tokyo Bay. Here Thomas discusses how the USS Laffey earned the nickname 'The Ship That Would Not Die' during World War II.
USS Laffey (DD-724) fought one of the epic battles of the radar picket line on April 16. The battle began at 0744 hours when radar picked up a single bogey that turned out to be a Val snooper that was driven off by 5-inch gunfire. At 0829 hours, radar picked up a swarm of incoming bogeys. Lookouts soon spotted over 50 Vals, Judys, Kates and Oscars, which were the formation that the Corsairs of VF-10 and VMF-311 would fight it out with.
Four Vals broke off from the formation and split into two two-plane formations, with two Vals on the starboard bow and the other two angling astern. The two forward 5-inch mounts opened fire and splashed the two Vals ahead, but the two astern commenced their attack. Flying low, one Val caught a landing gear in the water and nosed in. Converging gunfire from Laffey’s 20mm and 40mm guns, and 40mms aboard LCS-51 destroyed the fourth.

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Laffey during World War II
Two Judys came in low and straight on the starboard beam. The starboard amidships 40mm mount shot down the first and the destroyer turned to unmask the forward 5-inch guns, which hit the second Judy, but not before its bomb dropped and exploded close aboard, showering the weather decks with shrapne, injuring two sailors in the 40mm mount.
The seventh and eighth kamikazes, a Val to port and a Judy to starboard, bored in. Laffey’s gunners knocked down both. As the Val closed in from dead astern, it clipped the after deckhouse and drenched the ship’s stern with aviation gasoline, touching off fires that were quickly doused before crashing alongside. By 0842 hours, Laffey had downed eight for eight.
The ninth attacker, another Val, was the first to crash the destroyer, smashing a 20mm gun tub atop the after deckhouse and killing three. The deckhouse again caught fire, throwing off black smoke that concealed the tenth attacker, a Val approaching from dead astern. The airplane hit the main deck aft, spilling fire across the ship.
At 0847 hours, stern 5-inch mount gun captain Gunner’s Mate 1/c Lawrence “Ski” Delewski spotted a Val off the starboard quarter that was so low and so close that only the 20mm gunners on the stern had time to shoot. Their rounds broke off pieces of the wing and fuselage but momentum carried the Val into the fantail where it skidded past the 20mm mount and struck Delewski’s mount. Six sailors inside were killed when the engine wedged in the gunhouse. The impact slewed the gunhouse to starboard, wrenched the port gun skyward and peeled back the gunhouse top deck. Delewski flew clear and landed 15 feet forward of the remains of his guns.
Laffey’s stern was now engulfed in fire. Running at flank speed only fanned the flames, so Captain Becton was forced to slow, but still managed to maneuver to dodge another oncoming Val on the starboard quarter. The planes bomb came loose however, and the resulting explosion jammed the ship’s rudders to port, locking Laffey into a 26-degree port turn.
Four FM-2 Wildcats from USS Shamrock Bay (CVE-84) arrived and shot down six attackers before running out of ammunition. At about this time, the Fighting-Ten Corsairs arrived overhead, but the sailors on Laffey were too busy to notice them. Even as the fighters went after the attackers, two more planes and another bomb struck the destroyer. When Lt(jg) Carl Reiman, leader of the Wildcats, who had shot down a Val and two Kates while defending Laffey, returned to Shamrock Bay, he reported that the destroyer was a goner.
Laffey had now lost power to her main batteries forward, reducing her defense to four 20mm guns. Conditions were so bad that the captain contemplated abandoning ship. With 30 kamikazes still overhead, the two Fighting Ten Corsairs were joined by Clarke’s four, and shortly thereafter the twelve from VMF-311. One Marine flew so low chasing an inbound Val that he sheared off a radar antenna and sustained such damage he was forced to bail out.
At 0934 hours, USS Bryant (DD-665) arrived. Maneuvering at flank speed, her gunners splashed several kamikazes before one crashed the base of her forward superstructure, knocking out the CIC and radio room, killing 34 and wounding 30 more. Bryant managed to limp to Kerama Retto on her own.
At 0947 hours, as the Corsairs continued their battle, Val number 21 dived on Laffey and dropped a bomb that wiped out the port 20mm gun mount, killing the crew. Minutes later, the 22nd attacker in 80 minutes was destroyed in its dive by 40mm fire from LCS-51. The sky was finally clear of attackers as the Corsairs winged away. The crew set about firefighting in an attempt to save their ship. By 1100 hours, Laffey was down by the stern when LCS-51 came alongside to assist in firefighting and to take off wounded. LCS-51 took Laffey in tow and by the next day “The ship that would not die,” as Laffey came to be known, entered Kerama Retto’s Boneyard. She had survived the most determined kamikaze attacks of the war, hit by four bombs and six kamikazes, wounding 72 crewmen and killing 31.
Temporary repairs were rushed and Laffey departed three days later for Saipan, arriving on 27 April. On 1 May she got underway for the Todd Shipyard at Tacoma, Washington, via Eniwetok and Hawaii, arriving in Tacoma on 24 May, where she eased alongside Pier 48, six weeks after her ordeal in the East China Sea. The Navy delayed sending Laffey into the shipyard until nearly 93,000 civilians could visit the destroyer and see for themselves the results of the kamikaze attacks at Okinawa and the bravery of her crew. Her repairs were completed the week of the formal surrender in September. After serving in the Korean War and throughout the Cold War, Laffey was the last Sumner class destroyer to be decommissioned, 9 March 1975. She was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1986 in recognition of her fight at Okinawa and is today moored in Charleston, South Carolina.

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Tidal Wave is now available to pre-order by clicking here. You can also order Thomas's other book on the US Navy's central Pacific Campaign, Pacific Thunder here. Also from Thomas McKelvey Cleaver:
How did the Musashi reach her fate?
Sinking Musashi
How did the Battle of Chosin River become legendry?
The US Marine Corps' Finest Hour - Battle of the Chosin Reservoir
Who was Medal of Honor recipient Thomas J. Hudner Jr.?
Thomas Hudner and the Battle of Chosin Reservoir


2. Let's Play Gaslands - Monster Truck Smash! - 2018-05-03 07:10:35
Guerilla Miniatures Games are back with another Gaslands playthrough, with Ash taking on Jason in the Monster Truck Smash! Will Team Warner claim victory, or will Big Red literally crush their dreams!


Gaslands is a tabletop wargame of car-on-car destruction in a post-apocalyptic wastelands. Grab the rulebook, some die-cast cars, and the carnage can begin! Order your copy today!
For more behind-the-scenes information about the game, head to the Gaslands website, run by author Mike Hutchinson.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 11 май 2018, 00:00

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1. Sneak Peek at July's Artwork - 2018-05-10 11:21:04
Today we're bringing you another artwork reveal, but this time we're taking a sneak peek into July releases. Which of these previews do you like the look of the most? Which will be added to your wishlist? Let us know in the comments below!

Campaldino 1289 by Kelly DeVries and Niccolò Capponi
Illustrated by Graham Turner

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This first plate is from Campaign 324: Campaldino 1289, which looks at this important battle between the major political factions in the city states of central and northern Italy, the Guelphs and Ghibellines. This scene depicts the last moments of Bishop Guglielmino degli Ubertini, as the Ghibelline line collapses under the pressure of Guelph superior numbers. Ubertini, represented with a mitre on top of his helm to represent his clerical-feudal status, is pulled from the saddle by a Florentine militiaman.
Soviet Cruise Missile Submarines of the Cold War by Edward Hampshire
Illustrated by Adam Tooby


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The second plate is from New Vanguard 260: Soviet Cruise Missile Submarines of the Cold War and shows the Project 675 submarine K-22 surfacing after colliding with the frigate USS Voge on 28 August 1976. This resulted in numerous damages to the conning tower and her forward cruise missile launchers, which resulted in the flooding of the tower. The Voge also suffered flooding to her steering compartment, and one of her propellers was damaged.
The FN MAG Machine Gun by Chris McNab
Illustrated by Johnny Shumate

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Our final image is from Weapon 63: The FN MAG Machine Gun depicts a US Marine Corps recon team gunner in An Nasiriyah, Iraq. He fires an M240G from the top of an armed Humvee, while at the back his comrade uses a M16A2, with under-barrel M203 grenade launcher, as cover. Simultaneously, further 7.62mm fire is delivered by a dismounted team using M240 from an integral bipod. This exposed position of the M240 gunner is evident, and casualties for this position were high. Thus during the battle, and throughout the Iraq invasion and subsequent counterinsurgency, soldiers began to add improvised armored shields in front of the guns, to give some measure of protection.
Campaldino 1289, The FN MAG Machine Gun and Soviet Cruise Missile Submarines of the Cold War are now available to pre-order, along with the rest of our July books. Click here to browse more!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 16 май 2018, 00:00

Kagero's Area
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1. The Habsburgs’ Wings 1914 vol 1 - 2018-05-14 06:39:00
The Great War (World War I 1914-1918) has been in the public consciousness for many years in the shadows of the heavily traumatized World War II (1939-1945).


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 25 май 2018, 00:00

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1. Osprey Games at UK Games Expo 2018! - 2018-05-22 09:51:00
UK Games Expo is fast approaching, but what can you expect to find as you stroll down Osprey Games Avenue towards stand 1-C4?
Can't make it to UK Games Expo? Well, we've still got a little something for you! Head to the bottom of the blog for more details! Play our latest releases!
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Want to play some of our latest games? We’ll have two great Reiner Knizia games available to try – High Society and Sakura, as well as Martin Wallace’s London: Second Edition and Peer Sylvester’s The Lost Expedition. Drop on by and try them out! Preview our upcoming games!
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Curious about what we’ve got coming out in the next few months? Well, UK Games Expo will be your first chance to play Martin Wallace’s Wildlands, our upcoming 2-4 player miniatures board game scheduled for release in October 2018! We will have a playable copy available all day Friday, and on Saturday and Sunday afternoon, so come to stand 1-C4 for your chance to play!
You'll also be able to take a look at Cryptid and The Lost Expedition: The Fountain of Youth & Other Adventures, both releasing in September! Meet designer Martin Wallace!
Award-winning designer Martin Wallace will be at our stand from 12:15 – 12:45PM on Saturday to meet you all and sign your copies of London: Second Edition! Check out our nominated games for the UKGE 2018 Awards!
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Wondering about which games you should vote for in the UKGE awards? We've had four games nominated - Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago (Best Miniature Rules), Gaslands (Best Miniature Rules), Kobolds & Cobblestones (Best Miniature Rules), and Dracula's America; Shadows of the West: Hunting Grounds (Best New Expansion). Pick up some fantastic board games and wargames!
Whether you are after something brand new, such as Reiner Knizia’s High Society or Ash Barker’s Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse, or looking for something from our extensive back catalogue, such as Odin’s Ravens or Frostgrave, we’ve got you covered!
We’ll have plenty of great games for you to buy at stand 1-C4, but if you already know what you want then please send an email with your name, desired game, and estimated collection time to https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk and put ‘UKGE Preorder’ in the subject line to reserve your copy. No prepayment is required, and we’ll hold onto them until 1:00 PM on the Saturday, after which any uncollected orders will be returned to general stock.
Also, while stocks last any purchase over £20 will receive a pack of promo cards for The Lost Expedition. Osprey Games pricelist
High Society
£15
Sakura
£20
London: Second Edition
£35
The Lost Expedition
£20
Star Cartel
£20
Samurai Gardener
£12
Zoo Ball
£15
Shahrazad
£10
Escape from the Aliens in Outer Space
£25
The Ravens of Thri Sahashri
£10
They Come Unseen
£30
Let Them Eat Cake
£15
Escape from Colditz
£40
Agamemnon
£15
Odin’s Ravens
£15

All Wargames priced at RRP (rounded to the nearest penny) Can't make it to UK Games Expo?
Don't worry, we'll be running daily competitions on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for anyone who can't make it to UK Games Expo this year. Keep an eye on our channels and enter for your chance to win some great games!


2. Operation Chastise - 75 Years On - 2018-05-17 09:00:00
On 17 May 1943, Operation Chastise, or the ‘Dam Busters raid’, was executed. Today marks the 75th anniversary of the famous raid, which saw Royal Air Force No. 617 Squadron using Barnes Wallis’s ‘bouncing bomb’ on the Möhne Dam and Eder Dam, as well as the Sorpe and Ennepe Dams.
The operation was a successful mission for the Allies, the Ruhr valley was flooded and two power stations were destroyed, and production in the area did not return to normal until September. An estimated 1,600 civilians, 600 Germans and 1,000 labourers died.
Below is an extract from Raid 16 – Dambusters: Operation Chastise 1943 by Doug Dildy. This extract focuses on the men who carried out the famous raid.
‘While [Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur] Harris followed [Air Marshal Sir Charles] Portal’s directive to proceed with preparing for an attack on the dams, he still refused to withdraw one of his Lancaster squadrons from the ongoing Battle of the Ruhr. Harris elected instead to create a whole new unit, to be formed largely with experienced volunteers.
On 15 March Harris directed the new AOC 5 Group, AVM Cochrane, to establish an as yet undesignated squadron (called ‘Squadron X’ until a number could be assigned by the Air Staff) and recommended 24-year-old Acting Wg Cdr Guy Gibson as its commander. Cochrane had been 5 Group commander for only two weeks and did not yet know Gibson. Nevertheless, on 18 March Cochrane interviewed Gibson, who had just completed his second Bomber Command tour only a week before. The interview went well and next day Cochrane met with Gibson and Gp Cpt J. N. H. ‘Charles’ Whitworth, commander of RAF Scampton, to give them the new unit’s initial operational tasking – albeit in the sketchiest of terms.
By this time the command’s wheels were in motion. What was to become the most famous squadron in the RAF was established on paper on 17 March and designated No 617 Squadron a week later. The unit was to be based at Scampton, a pre-war aerodrome four miles (6.4km) north of Lincoln. A Bomber Command base normally had two squadrons assigned, but in order to permit the construction of concrete runways the station had recently been vacated by 49 Sqn. This allowed, at least temporarily, ample space for aircraft parking, barracks, hangars, offices and shopfloors for the new unit. Gibson arrived on 21 March to examine his new unit’s home and plan the physical establishment.
Three or four days later – while Gibson was inWeybridge receiving his first briefing fromWallis on the Upkeep weapon and how it worked and was to be delivered – the first 14 Lancaster crews were posted into the new unit. Five – two of them captained by NCO pilots – transferred ‘across the aerodrome’ from the co-located 57 Sqn. In those days a Bomber Command squadron was organized in two flights (‘A’ and ‘B’), each with ten or so aircraft and crews. As a unit received additional aircrew, the men would be formed into a third (‘C’) flight which would later be used as the basis of a new squadron. Commanding ‘C’ Flight of 57 Sqn was Sqn Ldr Henry Young, DFC and Bar, the 27-year-old son of a London solicitor and an American socialite from southern California. Young had flown 51 operational missions in Western Europe, North Africa and the Mediterranean, with 102 Sqn on Armstrong-Whitworth Whitleys and with 104 Sqn on Wellingtons. On eight of these missions he commanded a ten-aircraft detachment on Malta. During his first tour Young had been forced to ditch twice, on both occasions saving his crew. The fact that he had spent more than 30 hours in the aeroplanes’ tiny life-rafts, as well as his fame as an oarsman in Oxford University’s 1938 championship rowing team, inevitably led to his acquiring the nickname ‘Dinghy’. Posted at the same time was Gibson’s ‘B’-Flight commander, 21-year-old Sqn Ldr Henry Maudslay, DFC. A 1940 graduate of Eton College, he was also an oarsman, having been named Captain of Boats in his final year. An experienced instructor, Maudslay had flown 29 operations in Handley- Page Hampdens (44 Sqn) and 16 on Lancasters (1654 Heavy Conversion Unit and 50 Sqn) before arriving at Scampton. Also from 50 Sqn was the talented but relatively inexperienced (26 operations) 22-year-old Pilot Officer Leslie (‘Les’) Knight, RAAF, and his crew, all of whom volunteered for what sounded like an interesting assignment. Three crews came from 97 Sqn. Flt Lt David Maltby, DFC, a reserved but determined 23-year-old graduate of Marlborough College, had flown five operations with 106 Sqn (Hampdens) and 21 with 97 Sqn (Hampdens, Manchesters and Lancasters) before commanding a section in 1485 Target Towing and Gunnery Flight at Scampton. Returning to 97 Sqn on 17 March, Maltby was given a new and inexperienced crew, all fresh from training. The 6ft 3in. (1.9m), 24-year-old red-headed Flt Lt Joseph ‘Big Joe’ McCarthy, DFC, was an American from New York City. Having joined the RCAF in May 1941, he had just finished his first operational tour. He and his crew had flown their 27th successful sortie on Lancasters – a raid on St-Nazaire – on 22–23 March. Relative newcomer Flt Lt John Leslie (‘Les’) Munro, RNZAF, flew his first operational sortie on 2–3 January 1943. He was an aggressive pilot, and he and his crew completed another 19 missions in the next 11 weeks. Returning from the St-Nazaire raid, they responded to a 5 Group circular ‘calling for volunteers from those crews nearing the end of their first operational tour…to form a new squadron to undertake a special mission’.

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Towards the end of the month another seven full crews, plus a number of additional personnel to plug gaps in other crews, were posted to the squadron. These included three pilots Gibson knew and personally requested.
Gibson’s favourite was 22-year-old Flt Lt John ‘Hoppy’ Hopgood, DFC and Bar. Hopgood was a Cranwell graduate, a veteran bomber pilot and an experienced Lancaster instructor. Hopgood had flown ten Hampden missions with 50 Sqn as a bomb-aimer/navigator and another 35 as a Manchester/Lancaster captain and instructor with 106 Sqn. While with 106 Sqn Hopgood had taught Gibson to fly the Lancaster four-engined heavy bomber. Hopgood made a strong impression on the commander with his ‘press-on spirit’. Also from 106 Sqn was 21-year-old Flt Lt David Shannon, DFC, RAAF. He had flown five missions as Gibson’s second pilot, developing a tight bond with his captain. After completing another 31 operations, Shannon had just obtained a posting to 83 Sqn to join the neophyte Pathfinder Force when Gibson recruited him for 617 Sqn. Only Shannon’s navigator, Flying Officer (Fg Off) Danny Walker, DFC, RCAF, followed his captain to Scampton.
Finally, there was Flt Lt Harold ‘Mick’ Martin, DFC, a 23-year-old Australian in the RAF. He was a veteran of 36 combat operations in two bomber tours, with 455 Sqn RAAF (Hampdens) and 50 Sqn RAF (Manchesters/Lancasters). Gibson had met Martin at a Buckingham Palace medals ceremony where they had discussed the tactical advantages of ultra-low flying. From 1654 Heavy Conversion Unit Martin and his wellexperienced crew headed to Scampton, with his bomb-aimer, Flt Lt Bob Hay, becoming 617 Sqn’s bombing leader.
In addition to these, Flight-Sergeant (F/Sgt) Kenneth Brown, RCAF, captained one of three additional all-NCO crews also transferred to bring the new unit to its full complement of flying personnel. Just after the briefing for Brown’s seventh mission with 44 Sqn – to Berlin on 27–28 March – his commander, Wg Cdr John Nettleton, VC, notified him that upon return he and his crew were ‘transferred to a new squadron … and I can do nothing about it’. Saying farewell the next day, Nettleton added encouragingly: ‘Brown, you’re going to be the backbone of this new squadron.’ Brown’s wireless operator, Sgt Harry Hewstone, commented upon arriving at Scampton and seeing who were already there: ‘Skip, if we’re the backbone of this squadron, we must be damn close to the ass end!’’
To read more about Operation Chastise, see Raid 16: Dambusters by Doug Dildy.


3. Gaslands: Time Extended - Issue 1: Savage Highways - 2018-05-11 14:58:44
The War Rigs are rolling out in Savage Highways, the first issue of Gaslands: Time Extended! Written by Mike Hutchinson and Glenn Ford, and featuring incredible photos from the Gaslands community, this free digital supplement includes additional rules for playing with War Rigs, four new scenarios, and a narrative campaign based upon these glorious juggernauts!

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Gaslands players have plenty more to look forward to, with new issues of Gaslands: Time Extended! coming every few months. Models from the community will be featured in each issue, so make sure you are part of the Gaslands Facebook group and check the forums!
Gaslands is a tabletop wargame of car-on-car destruction set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Players control small fleets of armed vehicles and shoot, ram, skit, and loot their way through the ruins of civilisation. Order your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 26 май 2018, 00:00

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1. Forty Years of Warship - 2018-05-25 16:01:00
This year is a very special one for Warship, as Warship 2018, publishing 31 May, is the 40th edition of the journal! Today on the blog we are joined by Warship editor John Jordan, who discusses the annual's history, looking at its beginnings, its changes, and its successes, which is perfect for loyal fans and newcomers to this impressive series.
When the first issue of Warship was published in January 1977, founding Editor Antony Preston wrote these words about the focus and aims of the journal:
Warship is a lively quarterly journal devoted to the design, development and service history of combat ships. The scope is truly international, unlimited by period, nationality or ship type, although initially the emphasis will be on the major navies of this century and World War 2 in particular.
Detailed and accurate information is the keynote of all articles – fully supported by plans, tables and photographs – and it is the aim of Warship to encourage an original approach to popular subjects as well as to cover the unusual and little-known aspects of warship history.
'Under the Guns' by William J Jurens (Warship 2018).
Since those early days there have been many changes at Warship: changes of editor, changes in organisation and layout, and an important change in format which took place in 1989 when the pressures of specialist publishing meant that the quarterly was discontinued in favour of an annual publication. The focus and aims of the journal, however, have remained essentially unchanged, and many readers and subscribers (including the current Editor and Assistant Editor) have remained with Warship throughout its forty years of life.
One of the great strengths of Warship has been the access and responsiveness it provides to the enthusiast, whether as contributor or reader. Long before the Internet had become the democratic force that it is today, Warship gave amateur experts and would-be authors alike the opportunity to ‘post’ their latest piece of in-depth research, and the readership was able to enlarge on or to correct the information in published articles in a section called A’s & A’s. Some of the contributors to the early quarterlies were already established authors; others would become established authors as a result of their association with Warship. A number of our readers have subsequently become contributors.

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HMS Effingham featured in 'Lost in the Fog of War' in Warship 2018 by David Murfin.
Copyright: Allan C Green collection, State Library of Victoria
It remains the case that the editorial team of Warship does not by and large ‘commission’ articles – although regular contributors will often present us with a menu of possible topics for us to choose from. The strength of the annual therefore lies in the variety of material, which covers every possible type of warship from the era of steam to the present day. Regular subscribers often tell us that they eagerly await publication to see what ‘goodies’ they will find, and that they spend weeks (even months!) ploughing through the material, starting with the articles that first catch their eye and then working through the rest of the annual. The big advantage Warship has over some of the websites which exist for enthusiasts is that there is a strong editorial team which can act as a ‘filter’, weeding out drafts submitted for approval which do not meet our high standards, and suggesting improvements and modifications to other potential contributors. We consider this ongoing dialogue between ourselves and our contributors, and between editorship and the readership to be a key process in the development of the annual.
Past and Future

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Like any journal with a lifespan of forty years, Warship has had to adapt to survive in the marketplace. In 1977 the postwar years constituted recent history; forty years on, virtually all the warships built during the 1950s – and even the 1970s – have long gone to the breakers. Data about their design and construction which were not available when the first quarterlies were published are now firmly in the public domain. The time-span of our coverage has shifted accordingly. Next year, for example, we will be publishing an article by Michele Cosentino about the Italian Navy’s attempts to acquire a nuclear-powered attack submarine during the 1950s, supported by plans and documentation which have only recently become available.
The nature of our coverage has also shifted slightly. The major warship types of the Second World War which were very much the staples of the early quarterlies have now received such extensive and detailed coverage in Warship and elsewhere that we have begun to look at new angles in which the ‘why’ becomes equally important to the ‘what’ and the ‘how’. This year’s annual sees the publication of a pair of major articles on the Battle of the River Plate. The first is a critique by historian Dr Alan D Zimm of the tactics adopted by the British Commodore Henry Harwood and his German adversary, Captain Hans Langsdorff, while the second, by ballistics authority William H Jurens, looks in detail at the damage sustained by Graf Spee using contemporary British and German reports and plans, some of which have only recently seen the light of day. There are also now far more articles on warships during the period 1850 to 1914 than was formerly the case. Next year sees the first in a series of articles by Philippe Caresse on the five battleships of the notorious Flotte d’échantillons (‘fleet of samples’) which entered service with the French Navy during the mid-1890s.
The late 1990s and early 2000s was a difficult time for Warship, marked by considerable slippage in publication dates due largely to a series of changes in the ownership of Conway, and the associated changes of office premises and of in-house editorial and production staff. However, since the appointment in 2004 of a new editorial team fully committed to the ideals that Antony Preston set for the journal, Warship has not only recovered lost ground but has gone from strength to strength. Publication has been progressively brought forward from July to May, and a long-term decline in sales been reversed. Many new authors, some with an international reputation, have come on board, and we can approach the future with confidence.
John Jordan
Editor, Warship
https://ospreypublishing.com/warship.editorial@bloomsbury.com
Warship: The Editorial Team
John Jordan is a former teacher of modern languages. He is the author of two major books on the Soviet Navy, and has recently co-authored a series of books for Seaforth Publishing on the French interwar navy: French Battleships (2009) with Robert Dumas, French Cruisers (2013) and French Destroyers (2015) with Jean Moulin, and French Battleships of World War One (2017) with Philippe Caresse. He is also the sole author of Warships After Washington (Seaforth, 2011). John has been associated with Warship as a contributor from its earliest beginnings and took over the editorship in 2004.
Stephen Dent has been a Warship reader since the very first issue of the quarterly in 1977. Twenty-two years on, after nearly a decade in the publishing industry, he found himself working on the annual, initially as designer before, in 2004, with the establishment of the current editorial team, adding the role of Assistant Editor. As well as his work on Warship, Stephen has contributed to many other books and periodicals, as designer, editor or illustrator, including co-editing Conway’s War at Sea in Photographs (2007).
Click here to pre-order your copy of Warship 2018!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 31 май 2018, 00:00

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1. Sneak Peek at August Artwork - 2018-05-30 15:05:00
Today we're looking ahead at three of our August titles and taking a sneak peek at some of the artwork featured in them. Which of these previews do you like the look of the most? Which will be added to your wishlist? Let us know in the comments below!
French Naval & Colonial Troops 1872–1914 by René Chartrand
Illustrated by Mark Stacey

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This first plate from Men-at-Arms 517: French Naval and Colonial Troops 1872–1914 depicts three uniforms of the colonial troops. Depicted here are troops from Madagascar and West Africa. The man on the left is a Private, Tirailleurs Sakalaves, c.1887–95, who wears a European-style tunic, with a red collar, straight cuffs and shoulder straps, white trousers, and a dark blue pillbox-like round cap with a red band. The figure in the middle, a Brigadier of Auxilaires Indigènes d’Artillerie, c.1892–95, is practicising a gun drill with an unfuzed 80mm shell. He is depicted as wearing an M1889 'cashew'-khaki collarless jacket, trimmed at the neck, pointed cuffs with red, brass buttons, tan linen trousers and a blue-tasselled red fez.The final figure is of a Private of the Tirailleurs Malgaches in their winter field dress, c. 1898–1914. This includes the dark blue jacket and trousers with yellow lace and piping respectively, worn for everyday service and formal dress. Here we show the trousers worn untied, over what seem from photographs to be long woollen drawers. This soldier, cleaning the bore of his M1907 ‘Colonial’ rifle, wears Lebel belt equipment over a red flannel sash; note too the gris-gris amulet hanging round his neck for supernatural protection – this was tucked out of sight inside the jacket on formal occasions.
The Solomons 1943–44 by Mark Stille
Illustrated by Peter Dennis

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This second plate, from Campaign 326: The Solomons 1943-44, depicts the largets naval battle of the entire Solomons campaign, the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay on 2 November 1943. Here, the leading Cleveland-class light cruisers of Rear Admiral Merrill's Cruiser Division 12 reach the peak of the gunnery duel with Japanese heavy cruisers Haguro and Myoko. The ship in the foreground is Montpelier, followed by Cleveland. Both ships have their 6in. battery trained to port and are firing furiously at the Japanese.
Roman Legionary vs Carthaginian Warrior by David Campbell
Illustrated by Adam Hook
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Our final plate is from Roman Legionary versus Carthaginian Warrior and depicts a skirmish between the lines. On the morning of battle Hasdrubal Gisco’s army has rushed to form up opposite Scipio’s threatening battle line, while Roman velites advance on the Carthaginian force’s screen of light infantry; missiles are exchanged as the two bodies of light troops dart back and forth, and as the morning drags on a series of intense localized skirmishes ensue. At one point the Iberians and Romans have come into contact, sparking a number of fast, vicious hand-to-hand combats. Several pairs of combatants are slashing and feinting at one another, while a veles with a wolfskin-decorated helmet catches an Iberian spear-thrust with his shield, batting it away and slashing his gladius at the throat of his foe.
Let us know which of these plates has caught your eye, and discuss below which of our August books you're looking forward to the most!
Take a peek at other artwork reveals!
Want to take a look at artwork featured in this month's releases?
Sneak Peek at May's Artwork
Take a look at next month's artwork!
Sneak Peek at June's Artwork
What did the Battle of Campaldino look like?
Sneak Peek at July's Artwork


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1. June Book Vote and May's Results - 2018-06-01 15:22:00
This month's book vote is all about our newest series, Air Campaign. We've seen a great response to this fantastic new series with our first four books in the series, and now we want your opinion on what should join the Air Campaign squadron! Have a read of the descriptions below, and make your vote!
Also below are our results of last month's incredibly close New Vanguard vote!
ACM: Schweinfurt-Regensburg Raids 1943
ACM: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Somaliland 1919–39
ACM: Ho Chi Minh Trail 1964-73
ACM: Russian Strategic Bombing in World War I
ACM: Stalingrad Airlift 1943
Schweinfurt-Regensburg Raids 1943: Eighth Air Force’s bruising “double-punch”
Under the Pointblank directive, intended to gain air superiority before D-Day by bombing Luftwaffe facilities, the ball-bearing factory at Schweinfurt and the Messerschmitt plant at Regensburg were high on the USAAF target list. But without an adequate long-range escort fighter, the B-17s would rely on the “double-strike” plan – hitting two major targets in the same operation, with the first raid drawing off the defending fighter force, to leave the second largely unmolested. But with 60 bombers lost and many more badly damaged, the experimental tactic proved costly. When Schweinfurt was attacked again later that year, even more bombers were shot down – proving that precision daylight raids desperately needed the USAAF’s upcoming P-51 Mustang escort fighter.
Iraq, Afghanistan, and Somaliland 1919–39: RAF counter-insurgency by biplane
Cash-strapped, but still with huge global responsibilities after World War I, imperial Britain turned to its newly independent RAF to police its restless colonies. With Somaliland in the grip of the Dervish Uprising, tribal rebellions in Iraq, and wars in Afghanistan, Waziristan, and the North West Frontier brewing, the RAF pioneered the expansion and refinement of air power between the World Wars – particularly the techniques of aerial counter-insurgency, but also air mobility and airlifts. In doing so the RAF learned many lessons about colonial warfare, with fascinating parallels to today. But it also mistakenly assumed many of these lessons would apply to the European theatre – part of the reason why the RAF entered World War II with misplaced confidence in its equipment and doctrine.
Ho Chi Minh Trail 1964-73: Cutting North Vietnam’s tentacles in Laos
Any possible victory in the Vietnam War depended on cutting the North’s supply lines to Viet Cong and regular NVA in South Vietnam – the “Ho Chi Minh Trail”. The air campaign against the Trail in northern Laos was Operation Barrel Roll. Much of Barrel Roll was improvised, highly secret, and sometimes completely unofficial. Antiquated but effective prop-driven A-1 Skyraiders and T-28s were used for close air support, including for CIA-backed tribesmen. Steel Tiger was the campaign further south. It was much better resourced – but still, the US had to devise methods for fighting an air interdiction war against near-invisible guerrillas, truckers and porters. This was the campaign that saw the first B-52 Arc Light strikes, and the introduction of the AC-47, the first in a long and fearsome line of American fixed-wing gunships.
Russian Strategic Bombing in World War I: The pioneers of the heavy bomber on the Eastern Front
At the outbreak of World War I, Imperial Russia’s air force was second only to France’s – and its fleet included the astonishing Sikorsky Ilya Muromets, the world’s first four-engined heavy bomber. Derived from an advanced 1913 luxury airliner, it was adapted into a bomber when war broke out. This being 1914, the heavy bomber had to be invented from scratch, but the Imperial Russian Air Service created a design both advanced and capable, with an internal bomb bay, fearsomely effective machine-gun defences, and accurate bombsights. It could also be used for photographic reconnaissance. It was a formidable weapon of war, able to bomb bridges, supply depots, troop concentrations and railway facilities with surprising – and shocking – accuracy. This book would be the story of the world’s first strategic air campaign, fought by these 80 huge aircraft on the Eastern Front for three years.
Stalingrad Airlift 1943: Goering’s broken promise to Sixth Army
The decision to keep Sixth Army defending Stalingrad, as the Red Army closed in, was based on the belief – and the promise – that the Luftwaffe could keep the army adequately supplied by air. This book would explain how the fateful decision was made, how the Luftwaffe tried, and why the campaign was lost. For despite a bitterly-fought battle by Luftwaffe transport units and their fighter escorts to fly as much into the besieged city as they could, the airlift failed. The freezing winter conditions, poor organization, and bad decision-making starved Sixth Army, and laid the foundation of the German defeat at Stalingrad and – ultimately – the beginnning of the end of the war.
Make your vote by clicking here!
May's New Vanguard vote was an incredibly close race! Four of our options had a great amount of interest, but there was only one winner, and by 0.24%, it was Robot Tanks of World War II. Take a look at the complete results below: NVG: Strategic SAMs of the USSR and Russia 20.78% NVG: French Main Battle Tanks 1945-present: ARL 44, AMX-30 and Leclerc 21.59% NVG: M4 Sherman in British Service 20.37% NVG: Pink Panthers: Land Rovers of the SAS 1950s-20 15.43% NVG: Robot Tanks of World War II 21.83%


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 юни 2018, 00:00

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1. Father's Day Sale 2018 - 2018-06-06 09:29:10
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With Father's Day fast approaching, we're offering 25% off General Aviation and General Military books and eBooks, as well as our Board & Card Games! Get a great deal and treat your loved ones to one of our many fantastic titles!
When?
The sale is running between Friday 1st June–Sunday 17th June.
What's included?
A great selection of our General Aviation, General Military and Board & Card Games are included, click the series tabs at the left-hand side of the website to browse more.
Our pre-order and 'available this month' titles, along with our May releases, are excluded from this month's sale.
How is the discount applied?
The 25% off discount will appear in your shopping basket labelled 'Father's Day Sale'.
Here are some of the fantastic books and games included in the sale:
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 08 юни 2018, 00:00

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1. US Flush-Deck Destroyers 1916–45 - 2018-06-07 16:06:00
This June sees the publication of Mark Lardas's US Flush-Deck Destroyers 1916–45. Today on the blog, Mark joins us to discuss the life of some of these destroyers following their wartime service.
Every warship class reaches the end of its life. In a lucky few, a specimen gets preserved as a museum ship. Examples include the World War II Town-class, with the cruiser Belfast, or the more humble Edsall-class destroyer escort, represented by USS Stewart in Galveston’s Seawolf Park. Most end with every ship going to the scrappers, even the most distinguished classes of warships.
The last surviving ship in a class often has an eccentric story. The last surviving US flush-deck destroyer is one example. It started out as USS Putnam (DD-287), but it spent the last two-thirds of its life as MS Teapa, a fast fruit boat.

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USS Putnam (DD-287) during its salad days as a United States Navy destroyer
Converting a destroyer to a fruit boat is not quite as bananas as it sounds. Destroyers are shallow-draft, allowing them to steam up rivers to banana plantations and load directly from the source. That saves transportation costs associated with sending bananas by rail to port.
A destroyer mainly consists of propulsion plant and weapons, but three-quarters of its power is required to squeeze out the last few knots of speed. It can cruise at half-speed quite comfortably on just one boiler. Remove the extra boilers and engine, and you have a fast vessel with a comfortable amount of storage space. You can even replace the steam plant with diesels, simplifying the engineering. An ex-destroyer moved fast enough that you did not need to refrigerate the bananas. Air scoops forcing fresh air over the fruit sufficed to keep it fresh.
(Shallow draft and high speed was one reason so many flush-deck destroyers were converted to troop transports in World War II. I suspect the Marines and soldiers crammed into these felt a kinship with the bananas carried in the fruit boats.)
Snyder Banana Company was the first to use destroyers as fruit boats. In 1920 it purchased three pre-World War I Truxtun-class destroyers, and converted them into banana carriers. The experiment proved successful. In 1930 the London Naval Limitations Treaty forced the US Navy to scrap 35 flush-deck destroyers. The Standard Fruit Company of New Orleans bought four of these destroyers marked for disposal: Putnam (DD-287), Worden (DD-288), Dale (DD-290), and Osborne (DD-295).

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SS Truxton - the former USS Truxton (DD-14) after conversion to a banana boat
All four had the wretched Yarrow boilers that wore out quickly, but that did not matter. The four destroyers were gutted, with the steam engines and boilers replaced by two 750hp diesel engines. With the two engines running flat out, their 1,500hp could drive the ships at 16 knots. As rebuilt, the ships could be loaded with 25,000 stems of bananas, or roughly 750 to 1,200 tons. A new superstructure was added, as were lots of air scoops, to ventilate the bananas in transit.
The rebuilt vessels were renamed (respectively) Teapa, Tabasco, Masaya, and Matagalpa. They entered service in 1931, running fruit between Central America and New Orleans. Tabasco ran aground in 1933 off the Yucatan Peninsula and was wrecked. The other three continued running fruit through the 1930s up until the United States entered World War II.

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MS Teapa after World War II
In early 1942, with the Philippines under siege by Japan, Douglas McArthur was calling for blockade runners to bring vitally-needed supplies to the beleaguered defenders. Someone remembered the ex-destroyers (perhaps because they were featured in a June 1940 Our Navy article), and decided these fast transports would make first-rate blockade runners. The Army chartered the three vessels, armed them, loaded them up with supplies, and started them to the Philippines.
Well, sort of.
Masaya left New Orleans for Corregidor on March 3, 1942, carrying ammunition, medical supplies, aviation gasoline, and mail for the garrison. Matagalpa followed with small arms, mortars, serum and (probably considered most vital in 1942) cigarettes. By the time both ships reached Pearl Harbor, Corregidor had fallen. Teapa, tail-end-Charlie, had only reached San Francisco.
Masaya and Matagalpa were redirected to Australia, where they served McArthur as transports in the Southwest Pacific Area. Neither ship lasted long. Matagalpa caught fire at dock, shortly after arriving at Sydney, Australia in June 1942. Gutted by fire, she was scrapped. Masaya ran supplies between Australia and New Guinea for nearly a year. Japanese dive-bombers caught her at Oro Bay (off New Guinea’s northeast coast, near Buna) on March 28, 1943 and sank her.

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Teapa was sent to the Aleutians, running supplies between Stewart, Alaska and Seattle, Washington. At least that was the plan. Shortly after arriving at Stewart for the first time, it too caught fire. A survey after the fire revealed the ship’s decks and wiring to be badly damaged. After unloading any supplies worth salvaging, Teapa returned to Seattle, where it remained for the rest of the war, serving as a training ship.
Disarmed and demobilized when the war ended, Teapa returned to the fruit trade. This time it was purchased by McCormick Shipping Corporation. From 1947 through 1950 it ran bananas between Central America and the United States. It was laid up in 1950.
By 1950, the United States and Great Britain had scrapped all the surviving flush-deck destroyers that either nation had. The Soviet Union had been lent nine during the war. One was sunk during the war, with six others returned by 1950. The Soviets were tardy about returning the remaining two. They had been stripped of parts to keep the other destroyers running, and were immobile. In 1952 the Soviets permitted Britain to send tugs to tow the ships back to Britain. Upon arrival they were promptly scrapped.
That left Teapa the sole surviving flush-deck destroyer. Why McCormick Shipping kept the ship is a mystery. It was out of date, uneconomical to run, and an expense to keep. Corporate inertia is probably the best explanation. In 1955 McCormick finally sold the hulk to a Miami-based scrap metal company. By year’s end the last flush-deck destroyer was gone.
To read about the military career of SS Truxton and USS Putnam, as well as other US Flush-Deck Destroyers during and between World War I and World War II, pre-order your copy of New Vanguard 259 by clicking here.


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1. Frostgroove - Frozen City Playlist Competition - 2018-06-12 09:32:34
Back in March we ran our Frostgroove contest, creating a playlist to accompany players in their games of Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago. Heritors could battle it out with the ‘Pirates of the Carribbean’ theme booming in the background, collect treasure as ‘The Idol Temple’ rang out, or just relax on the sun-soaked sands of the Lost Isles accompanied by The Merrymen’s ‘Hot, Hot, Hot’!
We had a lot of fun with it last time, so thought we'd run it again, this time looking for some cooler tunes that fit into the frozen ruins of Frostgrave. We’ve got more prizes up for grabs, so if you think you’ve got some great suggestions then keep reading to find out how to enter!

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This Sonancer has the right idea!
Artwork by Kate and Dmitry Burmak
The rules are simple! All you need to do is send us suggestions, either by emailing us at https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk with Frostgroove in the subject line, or by posting them on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram with the hashtags #Frostgrave and #Frostgroove. All entries must be received by Thursday 28th of June to coincide with the release of Frostgrave: The Maze of Malcor, Frostgrave: The Grimoire, and Frostgrave: Oathgold. If a song is chosen that was suggested by multiple people a winner will be randomly selected from everyone who sent it in.
Each of the winners will receive their choice of book from the Frostgrave range, some printed wizard sheets, and a couple of Frostgrave rulers.


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1. How to Play: Frostgrave: Fantasy Wargames in the Frozen City - 2018-06-18 10:22:32
Books from the Frostgrave range (excluding our June 2018 releases and preorders) are available at a 20% discount until 30th June 2018 (discount will show up in your basket). Add to your collection today!




Frostgrave: Fantasy Wargames in the Frozen City is an award-winning fantasy wargame in which players take on the role of powerful wizards leading a warband through the ruins of Felstad, searching for valuable treasure and battling rival adventurers and an assortment of monstrous creatures.
The videos in this blog were created by Watch It Played, and give a full breakdown of how to play the game, from warband creation through to tabletop skirmishes and campaign progression. With Rodney's expert advice you'll be battling through the Frozen City in no time! Creating a Warband
Rodney explains how you go about creating your Wizard and warband. To help you keep track of your band of adventurers, be sure to download the roster sheet from the Gaming Resources page!
Wondering which figures to use? You can use absolutely anything, but if you want to check out the official range from North Star Military Figures, head to their website!

Setting up your Table
Scenery is crucial in a small-scale skirmish game like Frostgrave. If you are looking for something quick and easy, but still giving that fantasy feel, take a look at the free downloadable scenery templates available on our Gaming Resources page.
You might also want to pick up a playmat to really set the scene. Be sure to take a look at this official Frostgrave playmat from Pwork Wargames!
How to Play
Spell-slinging, close combat, grabbing treasure, monstrous encounters! Rodney explains all the rules for you. When you take to the battlefield, it would be a good idea to have this handy Quick Reference sheet to hand, available from our Gaming Resources page.
Campaign Overview
Rodney explains Frostgrave's campaign system, which allows players to watch their Wizard and warband progress over a series of games.

Ready to start your exploration of the Frozen City? Now's the perfect time, with our Frostgrave sale offering great discounts on the Frostgrave range! Start your collection today!


2. Snapdragon - 2018-06-18 10:10:00

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Last month we published Snapdragon: The World War II Exploits of Darby's Ranger and Combat Photographer Phil Stern by Liesl Bradner. This incredible new book showcases the outstanding photographs taken by Phil Stern during his remarkable service during World War II as a combat photographer with Derby's Rangers, and uses Stern's catchy 1940s lingo and humour to transport readers 70 years back in time.
Today on the blog, author Liesl Bradner discusses Phil's entry into the war, his memoir, as well as letting us know which of his photographs is her favourite.
By early December 1941, World War II had been raging in Europe for two years. The British had been busy fighting in North Africa, Norway, and Greece. They had survived the Blitz and the debacle at Dunkirk. Meanwhile, across the Atlantic in the desert town of San Bernardino, California, Phil Stern, a budding photographer from Brooklyn, was on assignment for Popular Photography, to take pictures of the Women’s Ambulance and Defense Corps of America (WADCA).
In the early morning of December 7, Stern was snapping photos of the women reenacting with gas masks on when the field radios blared out, “The Japs have just bombed Pearl Harbor! The West Coast Army Command orders all officers and national guardsmen to report to their post at once!”
Phil hastened back to Los Angeles and immediately enlisted in the US Army. A few months later he was working at 35 Davis Street in London and Allied Headquarters at 20 Grosvenor Square as a Signal Corps Photographer. For a while, London was exciting for a young Yank’s first time across the pond, but boredom soon set in. Taking photos of high level officers and elite society parties wasn’t exactly what he had expected. Where was all the excitement and combat scenes he joined the Army to photograph? He desperately wanted to see some action and fight the Nazis. As luck would have it, Phil came across a notice in Stars and Stripes looking for volunteers to “get nasty with those Nazis – in an elite hit-and-run unit.” After getting the okay from his boss, Major Cuthbertson, Phil hopped on a train to Corker Hill in the Scottish Highlands, where he would train with the British Commandos. After meeting with Colonel Darby, the charismatic leader of the 1st Ranger Battalion, Phil would not only be designated as Darby’s Rangers official photographer but would also train and fight alongside the men as a bona-fide member of the elite army unit in North Africa, Tunisia and Sicily. He was given the nickname “Snapdragon” by one of his fellow Rangers. Now, if he could just figure out how to shoot a rifle.
The moonfaced, stocky snapper would also capture rare photos of three of the 50 rangers that fought alongside the Canadians and British in the Dieppe Raid on August 19, 1942. Little has been known about the Rangers’ top-secret first raid, codenamed Operation Jubilee. Three Rangers were KIA in the raid in Northern France. They would be the first American casualties in Europe during the war.

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Jumping ahead to 2011, I was assigned by my editor at the Los Angeles Times to interview Phil. I meet the 92-year-old Stern for the first time at his Hollywood bungalow home across the street from Paramount Studios. He had recently opened his own art gallery in Downtown Los Angeles and was exhibiting his collection of John Wayne photographs. Although politically the two were polar opposites, they remained friends until “The Duke’s” death on June 12, 1979.
During this time, I began researching and learning about Darby’s Rangers and Phil’s time in the US Army. (I’m a big history enthusiast.) I stayed in touch with Phil and his family, writing articles about his photos of Marilyn Monroe and Frank Sinatra, and his service in the war.

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D-day in New York City (Phil returned to the US in Oct. 1943 after being wounded in N. Africa & Sicily)
In 2013, Phil and his family were invited to Sicily for the 70th anniversary of the invasion of Sicily. It was his first time back since the war. After returning home to Los Angeles, I met up with him again for an interview for WWII Magazine. He seemed different – a little more cranky than usual. Seventy-year-old memories, previously hidden away in the dark recesses of his mind, had resurfaced. He shared difficult, painful stories about some ugly fighting in Sicily which he’d bottled up for decades. Two documentaries were filmed while in Sicily about his time there during the war. In 2017 The Phil Stern Pavilion, a permanent exhibit of his wartime photographs, was built in Catania, Sicily.
In early 2014, I got a call from the 94-year-old and his son Peter. Phil was moving into the newly built Veterans Home in West Los Angeles and wanted to donate 100 of his photographs to adorn the empty white walls. He asked me if I would spearhead an exhibit of his photos coinciding with his 95th birthday bash. While digging through his vast archives I came across a tattered, 77-page unfinished manuscript circa 1944. I immediately scanned the crumbling, yellowing pages and quickly read his incredible tales. His writing stopped after Kasserine Pass. Captivated by his fascinating stories, I wanted more, so I gave him a call. “Why didn’t you finish and get this published?”
After returning home to the US to recuperate from his injuries in El Guettar and Sicily, Phil was recruited by Uncle Sam to go on a cross-country bond tour. Afterwards, he soon got busy working in Hollywood and raising a big family. At one point actor Gary Cooper and director Fritz Lang expressed interest in a movie version of his manuscript, due to the popularity of war films at the time. Like many movies, Phil’s story, “Ranger’s Return,” never got made. The manuscript languished in a folio box for nearly 70 years.
Then, one day in November 2014, I got a voicemail from Phil. He was on a rant. He’d been reading Killing Patton, and wanted to straighten things out. Decades after General Patton’s death, Old Blood and Guts still put Phil in a fit. He’d had some run-ins with the colorful General in North Africa. “The S.O.B. caught me on the rear lines in Tunisia without a helmet and fined me 25 bucks and a night in the slammer!” His tirade continued. “This guy O’Reilly doesn’t know what the hell he’s talking about!” Phil proposed we write a book on his version of General Patton. “What about your memoirs?” I asked. “Oh, yes, get that published too,” he said.
Favorite Photo
Many people ask me what some of my favorite Phil Stern photos are. It’s tough to answer, as he made so many great shots. One of my favorites is the headless statue of the Italian politician Ruggero Settimo in front of the Politeama Theater, built in 1874 in Palermo. The composition and clarity is striking. Quite a difference from the muddy training photographs in Scotland. I believe Phil really blossomed in Sicily. Whether it was the Italian sunlight or trial by fire in North Africa, his images from the invasion of Sicily are some of his finest work. He snapped around 300 photos in the first five days of the Sicilian Campaign.

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A headless marble statue of the Sicilian patriot Ruggero Settimo stands on a 12-foot-high, multi-tiered marble monument in the Piazza Politeama square in Palermo. Heavy bombing by the Allies during the invasion of Sicily on July 10, 1943, blasted the head off the beloved politician, diplomat, and activist from Sicily who fought alongside the British fleet in the Mediterranean Sea against the French under Napoleon Bonaparte. In the background is the Politeama Theatre and triumphal arch topped by a bronze quadriga depicting the “Triumph of Apollo and Euterpe.” Phil Stern
Although Phil was one of the first photographers to land in Sicily at Licata Beach, fellow snapper Robert Capa was also there, parachuting into Sicily with the 82nd Airborne Division. Capa missed out on the early action, as he was stranded in a tree for hours near the town of Troina when his parachute caught on a branch. After the war, the two would often run into each other. Capa would try to recruit Phil to join his new artist agency, Magnum Photos. “I said no every time because I didn’t want to get killed and it seemed like many of his photographers were dying in battle.”
The closest Phil ever got to war again was on movie sets. He lived to be 95 years old.

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Phil Stern Quotes
“I didn’t want my mother to worry about me so when I told her I was a Ranger she thought I was fighting forest fires. When I was wounded in El Guettar she thought I’d fallen out of a tree.”
“You’ll never have a greater outfit than the Rangers. What fighters and what buddies. I’m proud to say I was one of them and I’m proud to say I was there.”
Snapdragon by Liesl Bradner is now available to order. Click here to get your copy!


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