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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. Why a Campaign on Nashville 1864? - 2017-10-06 11:25:00
Today on the blog we welcome back Mark Lardas, who discusses his latest book CAM 314: Nashville 1864, and dispels popular misconceptions about its link to the March to the Sea.
Why a Campaign on Nashville? Wasn’t that part of the March to the Sea? It is a question which appeared when Osprey announced the book. That question was actually one of the reasons I wanted to write a Campaign about Nashville. Despite a popular misconception, Nashville really was independent of the March to the Sea.

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It was fought at the same time as the March to the Sea, and many troops involved in both campaigns had fought in the Atlanta campaign which led up to both Nashville and the March to the Sea. The Confederate commander during the Nashville campaign, John Bell Hood, wanted them to be linked. He believed his invasion of Tennessee would force Sherman to abandon Atlanta and abandon any movement deeper into Georgia. It is easy to see why folks today believe the two are linked.
Yet they are not. Sherman made that decision when he decided to ignore Hood. Instead, he took what he believed were his best troops and marched south. Sherman gave the rest of his army to George Thomas, and dumped the problem of dealing with Hood into Thomas’s hands. Sherman then marched out of the picture and on to glory and Savannah.
Fortunately Thomas’s hands were capable ones. Thomas was left with a rag-tag collection of disparate troops. They included garrison troops, invalids from the Atlanta campaign, mostly-dismounted cavalry (Sherman took all the best horses), and Sherman’s problem children. Chief problem child was John McAllister Schofield, one of the most difficult subordinate generals any commander could inherit. Schofield was a competent battlefield commander, but his true talents lay in army politicking. He spent more time sniping at Thomas, in an effort to replace him, than he did fighting the Confederate invaders.
The Southern command included two of the Confederacy’s most fascinating
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commanders: John Bell Hood, and Nathan Bedford Forrest. Hood resembled the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail. He scattered bits and pieces of himself over several battlefields. By 1864 Hood had literally contributed an arm and a leg to the Confederate cause. Yet he was as pugnacious as ever, always seeking an opportunity to attack.
Bedford Forrest was equally pugnacious, but more measured in aggressiveness. A self-taught strategist, Forrest was possibly the best cavalry commander of the war. He never fought a stand-up frontal assault when a flank attack yielded better results. Forrest wanted to win – not prove his bravery.
Hood’s 1864 invasion of Central Tennessee was the result of Hood’s need to attack and always attack. His Army of Tennessee was too weak to attack Sherman’s forces in Atlanta and Hood did not want to stand on the defensive. So Hood convinced Jefferson Davis to allow the Army of Tennessee to attack elsewhere. Central Tennessee was far enough from Sherman’s Atlanta base that Hood could attack there.
Hood’s plan was based on several misconceptions. He assumed Sherman would react by chasing after the Army of Tennessee. Instead Sherman completely ignored Hood. Hood also assumed Confederate sympathizers in Tennessee (and possibly even Kentucky) would flock to his army as he advanced, strengthening the Army of Tennessee. By 1864 every male in those states willing to fight for the Confederacy had already joined up. The only folks remaining were pro-Union or those who simply wished to be left alone. Finally, Hood assumed Confederate courage could substitute for logistics. His army lacked both supplies and the train to move supplies.
Davis was aware of these problems. He approved Hood’s plan for one simple reason: it was a plan, and no other plan was offered. Despite the long odds against the Confederates, Hood’s invasion of Central Tennessee offer perhaps the last opportunity for the South to win the Civil War, especially after Lincoln’s reelection.
Hood’s principal opponent, George Thomas, was as fascinating as Hood. A Virginian, he stayed loyal to the Union. He was possibly the most underrated Union commander of the Civil War. A quiet man, he had two outstanding talents: He was a tenacious defender and a powerful attacker. He saved the Union Army at Chickamauga and Chattanooga in 1863. His attack in the center of the Confederate line on Missionary Ridge shattered the Army of Tennessee on the third day at Chattanooga.

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US gunboat General Grant, one of the many vessels carrying supplies and providing firepower on the Tennessee River
Thomas was never held in high favor by Grant. Thomas was methodical and deliberate, too methodical and deliberate for Grant’s taste. Yet when Thomas did strike it was always with the effect of a sledgehammer striking a lathe screen.
Although Thomas’s forces outnumbered Hood’s army, Thomas had his army scattered from the Cumberland to the Tennessee Rivers. One of his corps was not yet in the theater when the campaign started, as it was en route on the Cumberland River. Thomas also had the challenge of facing Hood while simultaneously holding Nashville and Chattanooga, Tennessee.
I first became aware of the Nashville campaign while writing Warrior 114: African American Soldier in the Civil War. (Black troops played a significant part in the Union victory at Nashville and in the various holding actions which led up to that battle.) The more I read about this campaign, the more convinced I became that this was one of the most neglected and ignored campaigns of the American Civil War. It was the Confederacy’s last chance – and the campaign where a neglected American hero, George Thomas, managed something Grant never achieved: destroying a Confederate army in the field.
Read the book, and tell me whether or not you agree with my assessment.
Mark's new book Nashville 1864 is now available to preorder from our website, you can do so by clicking here.


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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 11 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. Mapping Naval Warfare Quiz - 2017-10-10 15:41:00
To mark the publication of Mapping Naval Warfare by Jeremy Black, we've put together a quiz based on the maps and charts in the book. How many can you get right?
Mapping Naval Warfare by Jeremy Black publishes on 19 October. Click the link to pre-order today


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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 12 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. Triple Sprue Challenge... The Results! - 2017-10-11 14:35:00
All the entries are in, and it was a great set of conversions and kitbashes! Thanks and congratulations to everyone who entered the Triple Sprue Challenge – there were some incredible entries, and some just plain bizarre ones! We’ve got a full gallery of all the entries for you to browse at the bottom of this page – there might be some inspiration lurking in there for your next modelling project…
The Osprey Games judging panel entered into heated debate to determine the winners, and the office rang out with the sound of points and counterpoints concerning the merits of full weapon conversions versus hand swaps, and the most intriguing alternate uses for pointy hoods and swagbags.
So, without further ado, the winners are…
Runners-Up
Each of these talented kitbashers wins a copy of the Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago rulebook.
David Powell

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David’s entry might not have the same degree of converting that some other entries do, but it’s a really clean, polished set. Each figure has a distinct tone, from the nervous young apprentice to the confident, veteran wizard and the swashbuckling captain – but all work well together.
Silverhands Workshop

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Silverhands Workshop’s entry features heavy converting and kitbashing throughout. The attention to detail is wonderful – the pipe being smoked by the captain, the wizard’s half-skull visage, the demonic head being summoned by the apprentice are particular favourites.
Sebastian Öwall

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The wizard’s staff in Sebastian’s entry is a very strong focal point, and screams out for development as a cult symbol or something! His captain has a really nice Assassin’s Creed vibe to it with the hood and dual-wield pose.
The Winner
For services to Kitbashing, the winner of the grand prize – a copy of the Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago rulebook and Accessory Pack, and a box of the plastic Crewmen – is…
Coen Westerduin

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A very strong approach to kitbashing from Coen, while still being relatively understated. Everything fits together as if it was intended to – the palm-cutting apprentice, the scythe-like staff, even the two-handed axe being carried by the captain. Nothing is designed to fit together like that, but in these models, they look as if they were. The horns are the obvious conclusion of this approach – trimmed and integrated to perfection. As Joseph McCullough said: “I wish someone would cast those up as I'd love to paint them”.
Gallery

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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 13 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. Combat October Sale - 2017-10-12 11:41:00
Throughout October, we’re offering all Osprey customers 20% off our Combat (CBT) and Duel (DUE) titles. Last month we delved into New Vanguard and Weapon’s back catalogue, and we thought it would be fun to do the same for Combat and Duel.
In today’s post, we’re looking at the countless face-offs our Combat series has covered.
The Beginning
From the Hundred Years’ War to World War II, Combat has covered a huge range of skirmishes and battles in its short life. Beginning in 2013 with CBT 1: British Paratrooper vs Fallschirmjäger, Mediterranean 1942–43 and CBT 2: Union Infantryman vs Confederate Infantryman, Eastern Theater 1861–65, the series is releasing its 28th addition this month with German Soldier vs Soviet Soldier, which is released to mark the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Stalingrad.

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The above image is from CBT 28: German Soldier vs Soviet Soldier, showing men from Pioneer-Batallion 336 and the 334th Rifle Regiment engaging in the horrors of house fighting in the buildings along Prospekt Lenina.
If you aren’t familiar with the CBT series and its layout, each title assesses the ethos, organization, weapons and tactics of the troops on both sides in a particular conflict, focusing on their combat performance in three battlefield encounters. Featuring photographs, maps and immersive specially commissioned artwork and drawing upon first-hand accounts and operational histories, the series allows us to experience the heat of battle in a unique way. In particular, the split-screen 'soldier's eye view' comparison illustrations provide a glimpse of the battlefield from the different viewpoints of the opposing forces.

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An example of a comparison piece featured in CBT 16: Templar Knight vs Mamuk Warrior.
Have You Seen?
In August and September, our Big Reveal series let you in on what would be published in 2018. Combat fans will be glad to hear that 8 new titles will join the fold, taking our series up to 37.
From the height of the Greco-Persian Wars to the French Indochina War, you’re sure to find a topic of interest in our 2018 CBT list.
To read more about our 2018 books and CBT titles, click here.
Bestsellers
As our Combat series continues to grow, here are some of the most popular additions to the series, which may help you choose your next read.
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What was your first CBT book? Do you have a favourite? Let us know in the comments below!


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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 17 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. The 75th Anniversary of Pat Reid's Escape from Colditz - 2017-10-15 09:28:26
'I can think of no sport that is the peer of escape, where freedom, life and loved ones are the prize of victory, and death the possible though by no means inevitable price of failure.' — Major P.R. Reid, 1952
Today marks the 75th anniversary of Pat Reid’s escape from Colditz Castle, the formidable mountain fortress that the Germans used as a Prisoner-of-War camp in the Second World War. To commemorate the occasion, we look back at some of the successful escapes, attempts, and near misses from the Allied soldiers imprisoned in Oflag IV-C.
The First Escape from Colditz Castle
It was a French Officer Lieutenant Alain Le Ray of the 159e Régiment d’Infanterie Alpine who first escaped the seemingly impenetrable fortress, breaking out on 11 April 1941. Rather than relying on months of planning and preparations, Le Ray’s was a ‘snap’ escape. He recognized an oversight by the Germans when escorting prisoners to the castle park for their exercise periods – a bend in the pathway where, for a matter of seconds, the party would be out of sight of the Germans. He seized this opening, hiding in the undergrowth until the party had returned to the castle, then taking shelter in the cellar of a ruined summerhouse to wait for the cover of darkness, when he was able to slip away to freedom.
The First British Escape Attempt
The first British escape attempt from Colditz Castle in World War II was made by the diminutive Lieutenant ‘Peter’ Allen, who was sewn inside a straw mattress and removed from the POW camp by a group of French labourers. When the coast was clear he emerged dressed in shorts, knee socks, and a casual jacket, hoping to pass as a member of the Hitler youth. Unfortunately, after being turned away by the United States Consulate, the exhausted and starving British Lieutenant turned himself in at a local police station and was returned once again to Colditz.

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The Case of the Watch
One particularly elaborate disguise was foiled due to a dropped watch. On 25 June 1941 , a young German woman walking along the path leading up to the German courtyard was spotted by some British prisoners. A chorus of whistles and catcalls followed, but the woman did not react, and when Squadron Leader Brian Paddon noticed that she had dropped her watch he did the gentlemanly thing and passed the watch to the nearest guard to give to the lady.
Unfortunately, the young lady was actually Lieutenant Boulé, a French officer who had gathered the necessary pieces of his disguise from packages sent by his wife. Whilst convincing at a distance, the disguise did not hold up under closer scrutiny from the German guard and he, too, was caught.
The Dentist
Sometimes, it’s best not to overthink things. On 17 December 1941 a group of five French officers were escorted to the town dentist for treatment. Once they exited the surgery, three of them bolted in different directions, leaving the two guards who had taken them with an impossible task. One of them clearly had to stay with the remaining two prisoners, and the other could not pursue all three. Despite their best efforts, with local police, garrison troops, security, and civil defence forces all called into action, the three Frenchmen successfully made it to freedom.
Airey Neave and the First British Home Run!
In 1942 two British Officers and two Dutch officers made a bold bid for freedom through the guardroom of Colditz Castle. As no one would expect the prisoners to escape in such a brazen manner, it was felt that their attempt would go largely unheeded. Disguising themselves as German officers, the group was paired off, with the Dutch assuming the roles of the senior officers and the Brits their subordinate. All four made it out of the castle, but Lieutenants John Hyde-Thompson and Donkers were escorted back to the castle by a railway policeman, the very same man who had earlier allowed Leiutenants Neave and Luteijn pass unhindered.
Shortly thereafter the news reached the castle – Neave and Luteijn had made it to the Swiss border. A home run!
Pat’s Escape
After the evening roll-call on 14 October 1942, Captain Pat Reid and a group of British Officers set their plan into action, making their way to the prisoners' kitchen. From there the plan was to get into the German courtyard, break into one of the storage buildings and abseil down the outer wall of the castle to freedom. Meanwhile, Wing Commander Douglas Bader was to keep lookout, whilst conducting a musical ensemble from a position overlooking the area. When the coast was clear, the musicians were to stop playing and the men would know they could make a break for it!
Unfortunately, it didn’t quite go to plan. The storage building was locked, with just a small chute available as a means of escape. Dressed as they were, they could not fit through the chute, so the men had to strip naked to wriggle through it, passing their clothes through to one another and dressing on the other side. Reid reached the Swiss border on the night of 18 October along with Canadian Flying Officer ‘Hank’ Wardle, with Major Littledale and Lieutenant-Commander Stephens reaching it the following evening.

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If these tales have inspired you to try your hand at escaping from Colditz Castle then pick up a copy of the 75th anniversary edition of Escape from Colditz.


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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 18 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. Sinking Musashi - 2017-10-17 11:10:00

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This month marks the 73rd anniversary of the Battle of the Leyte Gulf between the allied US and Australian force, and the Imperial Japanese Navy. On 19 October, Pacific Thunder by Thomas McKelvey Cleaver will be published, which offers a thorough and compelling look at the US Navy's Central Pacific campaign, from Guadalcanal to the recapture of the Philippines.
Today on the blog,Thomas looks at the sinking of the Imperial Japanese Navy's Yamato-class battleship Musashi at the Battle of the Leyte Gulf.
On 17 October 1944, the Seventh Fleet moved into Leyte Gulf to land Army Rangers on Suluan Island and secure entry to Leyte Gulf and the invasion beaches. The 420 transports, protected by 157 warships, were the largest invasion force yet seen in the Pacific.
Admiral Toyoda was fresh from the Battle of the Formosa Sea, in which his aviators had claimed 11 American aircraft carriers, two battleships, three cruisers, and one destroyer sunk, while damaging eight additional carriers, two more battleships, four other cruisers, and fourteen more destroyers. With this “victory” he believed the opportunity had arrived to engage the badly damaged American navy in a decisive surface battle that would secure the Japanese Empire.
He ordered the Shô Ichigô Sakusen plan into effect.
The plan, as were all Japanese battle plans, was complicated. Far-flung forces would be brought together on tight schedules, while no commander would deviate from the plan, and the enemy would play his role in accordance with the Japanese script.
Because senior Japanese leaders believed the reports of serious damage, they expected the Imperial Navy would meet the enemy on a basis of relative equality of strength.
Admiral Kurita’s center force would advance through the San Bernardino Strait, between Luzon and the Leyte islands to the north of Leyte Gulf, to meet the southern force; which would advance through the Surigao Strait between the Leyte and Mindanao islands to the south of the gulf. The two would meet outside Leyte Gulf and attack the defenseless invasion fleet.
Kurita’s fleet included Musashi and Yamato, the largest and most powerful battleships ever built, accompanied by the older battleships Haruna, Nagato, and Kongô; the heavy cruisers Atago, Maya, Takao, Chôkai, Myôkô, Haguro, Kumano, Suzuya, Tone, and Chikuma; the light cruisers Noshiro and Yahagi; and fifteen destroyers. It was the strongest surface fleet ever sent into battle by Japan.
Kurita departed Singapore on 22 October. At dawn on 24 October, the fleet entered the Sibuyan Sea, having survived an attack by American submarines that had sunk the admiral’s flagship. At 0810 hours, Musashi’s lookouts spotted American aircraft. Task Force 38 now knew the center force’s location.

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Task Force 38
Task Group 38.3 launched a first strike at 1050 hours. USS Essex’s 16 Hellcats, 20 Helldivers, and 22 Avengers joined a similar force from Lexington. They were plagued by low overcast and five mile visibility in haze. Musashi spotted them at 1330 hours.
Newly-promoted Lieutenant Commander John Bridgers, now Bombing 15's executive officer, remembered the strike:
“Our squadron launched two six-plane divisions, the first led by our skipper, Commander James H. Mini, who was also acting as target coordinator for all the planes from our air group. My Silent Second was the other.
“We flew west through heavy cumulus clouds in which the overall strike group became separated, though our air group managed to stick together. We flew across the southern tip of the island of Luzon and out over the inland waters, which were empty of ships. Commander Mini sent a division of our covering fighters to scout to the south. In short order, a message came back, ‘Jesus Christ, the whole Jap fleet’s down here!’
“We headed there at 15,000 feet, flying above the scattered clouds. The skipper’s division was slightly ahead and off to starboard when suddenly the enemy announced its presence with a large spread of variously-colored bursts of radar-directed antiaircraft fire coming up through the clouds and mostly clustered around the lead planes.
“Commander Mini radioed he was preparing to attack a battleship directly ahead, and directed me to turn east and concentrate on another battleship, which he promised I would see as soon as I reached the edge of the cloud bank I was over.”
Mini took a division of Avengers, leaving the others with Bridgers. “Suddenly, from beneath the clouds, steamed a dreadnought of vast proportions, the largest I had ever seen.” It was Musashi.
“Multiple streams of tracer fire came up at us and the battleship’s deck blossomed with muzzle blasts from larger AA guns, presumably the source of the clusters of colored bursts of smoke in the sky, all of which were augmented by similar fire from her screening vessels. I radioed that we were starting our high-speed approach so that the torpedo leader would know to start his let-down to sea level.
“We entered a power glide down to 12,000 feet. Then I signaled to attack and pulled up slightly across the plane flown by my wingman, Warren Parrish. I gradually steepened into my dive and opened my dive flaps.
“It was every man for himself, and suddenly I had my hands full. I started my dive stern-to-bow on the target, but my Helldiver was twisted around in a violent skid, which I couldn’t control with full rudder pressure and trim-tab adjustment. In this condition, my aircraft was away from its flight path and the trajectory my bomb would follow after its release. I figured if this was how it was to be, then my greatest dropping error would be a deflection laterally. I did my best to skid down across the length of the ship in order that my major dropping fault would be fore and aft. In hundreds of dive-bombing runs I’d made, I’d never experienced such wild gyrations. The antiaircraft fire, evidenced by tracers and puffs, was coming from all quarters, from ships large and small.

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Lt. John D. Bridgers airborne
“During my dive, I saw the main battery of heavy guns trained toward our torpedo planes. When those guns fired, the ship literally disappeared in a cloud of smoke illuminated by an internal blossom of flame. It was more frightening than dangerous to the torpedo bombers as large-caliber shells meant for heavily armored ships were rather ineffective against small, speeding aircraft unless they ran into a water spout straight on. All that being said, it must have seemed fearsome to the torpedo crews head-on.
“My dive, rather than being a smooth and even descent, had been a wild, spiraling ride. I released my bomb at 2,500 feet, but with a sense of fruitlessness, knowing my aim was guesswork at best.
“I broke my dive, closed my dive brakes, and headed for low altitude just above the wave tops. To my surprise, the plane once more flew with good trim and easy control. Fleeing the enemy ships, I couldn’t see what happened to our target, but the antiaircraft puffs in the air and the splashes in the sea off our port and starboard let me know the Japanese were still in business. Once I could turn and look back, the big ship looked undamaged and still running at flank speed with guns still blazing.”
Warren Parrish made a controlled dive and dropped his bomb right amidships on Musashi. Pulling out, he went so low the prop sent up salt spray over the airplane while its blast created a wake on the ocean’s surface. Parrish’s escape required he climb over a Japanese destroyer, all the while taking fire from 37mm and 25mm antiaircraft weapons as he dodged and weaved.
The other five members of Bridgers’ “Silent Second” division found him following their attacks. Bridgers remembered, “None of our other planes were to be seen, not the skipper’s division of dive-bombers, not the fighters or torpedo bombers. As we headed home, the pieces began to fall into place. My gunner, Bob Cribb, called me on the intercom and revealed what had happened in our dive. From the rear seat he had been able to see that my dive brakes had opened on only one side, which accounted for the wild ride in the dive, and that the flight returned to normal after my pullout.”
Torpedo 15's CO VeeGee Lambert reported: "Coming in through the most intense and accurate AA yet experienced, the squadron made three hits on one battleship [Musashi recorded four], two hits on another battleship, and two hits each on two different heavy cruisers."

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From left to right, Digby Denzek, Bob Cosgrove and Loyce Deen
Bob Cosgrove led the attack from port into intense and accurate antiaircraft fire as he pressed home a close-range attack and got a hit. Gunner Loyce Deen was hit by a piece of shrapnel in his right foot, but quickly fashioned a tourniquet and made no report of his injury until they returned.
Gunner David Miller had a unique experience. He had been replaced in the turret by Liberty Magazine correspondent Morris Markey. Markey had two 16mm movie cameras to record the attack. Before takeoff, he was told to buckle in tight, even if it meant he couldn’t wield the cameras as wished.
As Ensign Crumley bored in toward Musashi, Miller set the torpedo’s running depth and crawled back to the radio compartment. Nearby flak bursts jolted them. Markey had loosened his seatbelt despite instructions and dropped one camera, which landed on top of Miller directly below him. The camera burst open and suddenly 500 feet of film filled the compartment.
“All of a sudden, I was surrounded by 16mm film, which was like trying to get out of a spider’s web. The more I tried, the more tied up I got! We’re bouncing around, flak is going off to either side, shrapnel is flying through the airplane, and there I am, struggling to get free of this movie film! I finally got free just as we dropped the torpedo and pulled up really sharp. I looked out the window and we were maybe fifty feet above the bow of the biggest battleship I ever saw, and I was staring right at these Japanese officers in white uniforms on the bridge!” Miller only got a quick glance at Musashi as Crumley ducked back low and darted his way out of the fleet.
The first Essex strike created the most damage of any against Musashi. The Helldivers scored two hits to starboard, one amidships and the other abreast turret number three, both of which caused casualties among the nearby AA gun crews. Two other bombs hit the port side near turret number one. The fact there were only four hits from twelve bombs dropped showed the crews were exhausted and no longer at their best. Nevertheless, Bombing 15's score was better than any other Helldiver unit.
Torpedo 15 made the big score. Four solid hits included two in the starboard bow that flooded storerooms and caused a list to starboard. A third hit portside forward of turret number one. The fourth struck port amidships. These hits sealed Musashi’s fate.
To pre-order your copy of Pacific Thunder, The US Navy's Central Pacific Campaign, August 1943–October 1944, click here.


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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 19 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. Sneak Peek at January's Artwork - 2017-10-18 11:54:00
Once again, it’s time to reveal some of the incredible artwork featured in our upcoming titles. As always, we'll be taking a sneak peek at three plates, which today includes an exclusive look at our new Air Campaign series.
So, without further delay...
CAM 317: Operation Market-Garden 1944 (3) by Ken Ford
Illustrated by Graham Turner

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This first plate comes from the third part of our Operation Market-Garden series. In this particular piece of artwork, a column of Tiger tanks are engaged by troops of the 5th Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry on the road between Nijmegen and Driel. Whilst bringing supplies to the Polish Brigade, Lt. Col. George Taylor decided to set a trap for the German tanks crossing the rear of his route in the direction of Elst.
This is definitely one of my favourite images of the month, as Graham Turner has captured the moment in such an atmospheric and dramatic way.
ELI 221: Roman Standards & Standard-Bearers (1) by Raffaele D’Amato
Illustrated by Peter Dennis

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This second image is from the first part of our Roman Standards Elite series. In this image, three musicians from the Trajanic period are depicted. The first is a Legionary cornicen wearing a bear pelt over his bronze Imperial Italic helmet. The second is a trumpeter wearing a lioness pelt, whilst the third is a signifier who is wearing a wolf pelt.
Find more of these incredible pieces of artwork, and more on the standards and standard-bears in Elite 221, now available to pre-order.
ACM 2: Rabaul 1943–44 by Mark Lardas
Illustrated by Mark Postlethwaite

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Our final plate today is from our brand new series, Air Campaign. We recently showcased ACM 1’s cover on our Instagram, so I thought it would be a good idea to take a sneak peek at ACM 2: Rabaul 1943–44.
The plate here depicts the Fifth Air Force’s follow-up strike on the Japanese airfield at Rabaul. Here, 50 B-25s, led by Lieutenant Colonel Clinton True, attack Tobera and Rap opo airfields. Following the attack on Rap opo, the three squadrons ran into a buzz-saw of Japanese fighters. This is another epic image, which immediately stood out to me when looking at January’s artwork, with the B-25 flashing its teeth in the foreground as the Japanese attack from above.
These three titles, as well as the rest of our January 2018 books are now available to pre-order. To view our upcoming books click here. Don’t forget to let us know in the comments which is your favourite plate!


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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 20 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. EpicHistoryTV's Alexander the Great - Part Three - 2017-10-19 09:00:00
Below is Part 3 of the brilliant new series by Epic History TV. If you haven't seen parts 1 and 2, click here.

Alexander the Great has subjugated the Persian Empire west of the Euphrates, winning battles at the Granicus and Issus, capturing the city of Tyre and seizing control of Egypt. Now he heads east for a final showdown with Darius III, King of Kings, at Gaugamela. The great clash there will determine the fate of two empires, and win Alexander everlasting glory. But in the wake of victory, he faces the challenge of ruling over his new, sprawling empire, and dealing with usurpers and rebellion...


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Мнениеот Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 22 окт 2017, 00:00

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1. Robert Dodd and the Battle of Trafalgar - 2017-10-21 10:57:00
On 21 October 1805, 27 British Royal Navy ships sailed towards 33 French and Spanish vessels off Cape Trafalgar near the city of Cadiz. At stake was not only the outcome of this short naval campaign, but British independence, as the loss of her navy would leave her exposed to invasion and conquest by Napoleon’s armies.
What resulted was one of the most decisive battles, not only of the Napoleonic Wars, but in the history of naval warfare, as it would secure British dominance of the waves for the next hundred years and help lead to the downfall of Napoleon’s European empire.
Less than a month later, an illustration was published by the artist Robert Dodd showing the British ships audaciously approaching the enemy line in the opening phase of the battle. This image features in Mapping Naval Warfare, Jeremy Black’s new book for Osprey Publishing, and is accompanied by this description:

Изображение
(image courtesy of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich)
“Although the British fleet is shown with full rigging, the ships of the Franco-Spanish fleet are almost diagrammatic. Under the plate is a note from Dodd explaining that, for clarity’s sake, he ‘has judged it best (to avoid confusion that the smallness of scale would occasion), to dispense with exhibiting their sails and rigging, which if introduced, would in this view, have prevented their different flags from being seen’.
“At Trafalgar, the fighting quality of individual British ships, which was based on seamanship and the rapid rate of close-range fire by a trained crew, was combined with a bold command culture which emphasised manoeuvre and seizing the initiative in order to close with the opposing fleet and to defeat it in detail after it had been divided by intersecting the opposing line.
“Nelson’s plan and tactics provided the opportunity for British gunnery and seamanship to yield their results. Nineteen French and Spanish ships of the line were captured, giving Britain clear naval superiority, but Napoleon’s victories over Austria, Prussia and Russia in 1805–7 ensured that the War of the Third Coalition ended with France in a far stronger position in Europe than at the start of the conflict.”
If you would like to see more maps, charts, photographs and prints from the history of conflict at sea, check out Mapping Naval Warfare, which was released earlier this week. Click this link to order your copy today!



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